Robotic Surgery for Lung Cancer

The Robotic Thoracic Surgery Program utilizes the latest minimally invasive surgical technology to treat benign and malignant diseases of the lung, esophagus and mediastinum.

da Vinci Surgical System

Historically, surgeons performed lung resection (removal) for lung cancer through an incision between the ribs called thoracotomy. The incision would typically be at least six inches in length. At USC, our dedicated thoracic surgical oncologists use the da Vinci robotic system to perform complex surgery. As a result, our patients have enjoyed a shorter hospital stay and quicker recovery. These advantages allow our surgeons to operate on older and frailer patients who are considered too high risk at other medical centers.

Because minimally invasive surgery provides less physical and mental impact, patients requiring additional therapy, such as chemotherapy, are able to get treatment earlier and more completely than patients who opt for the traditional method. This results in a higher survival rate.

Our Surgeons

Jeffrey A. Hagen, MD
Dr. Hagen is Chief of the Division of Thoracic Surgery and Associate Professor of Surgery at the Keck School of Medicine of USC. He obtained his medical degree and general surgical training at Creighton University. He completed his thoracic surgery training at Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Southern California.

Daniel S. Oh, MD
Dr. Oh is Assistant Professor of Surgery at the Keck School of Medicine of USC. He obtained his medical degree at Loyola University Chicago and his general surgical training at the University of Southern California. He completed his thoracic surgery training at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School.